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What is Chloroquine?

Chloroquine is an anti-malaria agent and belongs to the drug class known as 4-aminoquinoline. It has secured its place in the list of essential medicine of the world health organization (WHO). Hans Andersag discovered Chloroquine in the year 1934. Chloroquine is available only with a proper prescription from a doctor, and You can take it orally.

What are the uses of Chloroquine?

Doctors prescribe Chloroquine to treat the following medical conditions:

  • Malaria (both treatment and prevention)
  • Amebiasis
  • Lupus erythematosus
  • Rheumatoid arthritis
  • Any other medical conditions as they determine

In a recent clinical trial, doctors found that Chloroquine is an effective medicine to treat SARS-CoV-2 or CVOID-19.

How does Chloroquine work?

Chloroquine is an anti-malaria medication that works against the malaria-causing parasite in the stage of its life cycle with the red blood cells (RBC). It is also beneficial in treating Lupus erythematosus and Rheumatoid arthritis symptoms, but its working against these diseases is still a question to answer.

What precautions to take while using Chloroquine?

Please do take the following precautions while taking Chloroquine:

  • Please take Chloroquine precisely as prescribed by your doctor. Please do not take it more often than prescribed, and you should try to be consistent throughout the treatment.
  • You should not take Chloroquine if you are allergic to it or any of its components.
  • Lactating mothers and expecting women should not take this medication without consulting their doctor.
  • To ensure that taking Chloroquine is safe for you, you should tell your doctor if you have or ever had the following health-related issues:
  1. Heart disease
  2. Heart rhythm disorder
  3. Vision problem
  4. Long QT syndrome
  5. Electrolyte imbalance
  6. Diabetes
  7. Liver infection
  8. Kidney disease
  9. Psoriasis
  10. Addiction to alcohol
  11. Genetic enzyme deficiency (glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency
  12. Porphyria
  • You should frequently visit your doctor and take proper body checkups to avoid Chloroquine’s unpleasant and unwanted effects.
  • Please avoid medical errors.
  • Tell your health expert if you are on any over-the-counter medication.
  • Please don’t stop taking Chloroquine suddenly; otherwise, you may suffer through the withdrawal symptoms.
  • Chloroquine may affect some medical tests; tell your pathologist that you are on this medication.
  • You can consult your doctor to learn more about the risks and benefits associated with Colcrys.
  • You may need frequent blood and urine test to determine if the said medicine is working well for you.
  • Taking Chloroquine may impair your thinking and reactions; therefore, you avoid getting involved in activities that requires attention and alertness.
  • You should take any antacid medication with a gap of two hours before and after taking Chloroquine.
  • If you ever experience uneasiness or any overdose symptoms after using Chloroquine, you should immediately consult your doctor and ask for medical help. You can also get emergency medical assistance by calling the poison helpline at 1-800-222-1222. Some of the Chloroquineoverdose symptoms that one can experience are drowsiness, seizures, slow heart rate, weak pulse, irregular heartbeats, etc.
  • If you take Chloroquine as a preventive measure for malaria, take medicine even after leaving the place (where malaria is spreading).

What are Chloroquine side effects?

The most common side effects of using Chloroquine include the following:

  • Nausea or vomiting
  • Diarrhea
  • Pain or cramps in the stomach
  • Headache
  • Mood swings
  • Hair fall
  • Change in the color of skin or hair

You should stop taking medicine and report to your doctor if you experience the following health-related issues:

  • Seizures
  • Ringing in your ears
  • Trouble in hearing
  • Weakness in muscles
  • Loss of coordination
  • Underactive reflexes
  • An abnormal result of complete blood count (CBC) resulting in fever, chills, tiredness, mouth sores, skin sores, easy bruising, unusual bleeding, pale skin, cold hands or feet, lightheadedness, or shortness of breath
  • Low blood sugar level causing sweating, irritability, dizziness, rapid heart rate, headache, changes in appetite
  • Severe drug reaction affecting your body- skin rashes, fever, swollen glands, muscle aches, severe weakness, unusual bruising, yellowness in the skin or eyes
  • Blurred vision
  • Trouble in concentrating
  • Distorted vision
  • A problem in sight during the night
  • Hazy or cloudy vision
  • Seeing light flashes or halos around the light
  • You become more sensitive to light.

You must report to your doctor from time to time if you ever experience any new symptoms or your symptoms are getting even worse.

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